Knowledge-Based Support of HAZOP Studies Using a CAEX Plant Model

This paper demonstrate show repetitive HAZOP tasks can be automated by means of a knowledge-based approach and shows the results achieved by using this approach in an initial prototypical implementation. The automated analysis is based on an XML file that contains the description of a plant according to IEC PAS 62424 (CAEX). © 2015 Risknowlogy. All Rights Reserved.

Description

HAZOP studies (from HAZard and OPerability) are an internationally widely used method to identify potential problems with regard to the safety and operability of technical systems. The HAZOP method had originally been designed for chemical plants but is also applied nowadays to plants in other branches of industry, primarily to assess design alterations and to evaluate existing plants. The release of poisonous, flammable or explosive substances in particular are specific safety problems. The safety-critical shutdown of a plant in general affects the productivity of the plant, and thus HAZOP studies are relevant not only from a safety-related but also from an economical perspective.

About this article

HAZOP studies are conducted to assess the safety and operability of technical systems and are an integral part of achieving safety according to functional safety standards, like IEC 61511. A significant amount of staff effort and corresponding costs are required to carry out HAZOP studies, with a large proportion of the workload consisting of often repetitive „drudge-work“. This article demonstrate show these repetitive tasks can be automated by means of a knowledge-based approach and shows the results achieved by using this approach in an initial prototypical implementation. The automated analysis is based on an XML file that contains the description of a plant according to IEC PAS 62424 (CAEX). Knowledge-Based Support of 
HAZOP Studies Using 
a CAEX Plant Model. © 2015 Risknowlogy. All Rights Reserved.

  • Authors: Till Schmidberger, Thomas Scherf, Alexander Fay
  • Published: May 2015
  • Words: 6355